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The Chauncey DeVega Show

The Chauncey DeVega Show is the official podcast of Salon.com politics writer Chauncey DeVega. On a weekly basis the show features a relaxed and free-form conversation with artists, authors, musicians, researchers, academics, journalists, activists, as well as Hollywood actors and directors.
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Now displaying: May, 2015
May 28, 2015

Leonce Gaiter is the guest on this installment of the podcast known as The Chauncey DeVega Show.

Leonce is the author of I Dreamt I Was in Heaven: The Rampage of the Rufus Buck Gang

He is a straight shooter and a real talker.

This is a great and honest conversation where Chauncey and Leonce have a real salon. There is no agenda or prepared set of questions in the conversation between Leonce and Chauncey: this is spontaneous, honest, and direct truth-telling without a filter.

We call this "grown folks talk".

The Chauncey DeVega Show has had some generous guests, and amazing moments of learning. This episode is one for the books.

In this episode, Leonce and Chauncey discuss notions of black male honor, revenge, and self-respect. What does it mean to be black, male, and brave? Why is American society afraid of black folks who claim their honor and self-respect?

How do movies that are revenge fantasies like Tarantino's Django, and commercial hip-hop, fit into America's collective imagination, anxiety, and fear about black manhood, respectability, and honor?

How do people of color navigate elite white spaces such as Harvard University, and what does that teach us about the color line? Why does black male self-respect and honor scare so many white folks?

Leonce also shares some great insights about writing, race, and the Old West.

Chauncey does some sharing in this episode about Memorial Day, Confederate white trash, thug cops, the Waco outlaw motorcycle riot and shooting, Barack Obama, and his recipe for frying pork chops.

May 21, 2015

Historian David Krugler is the guest on this week's episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show.

David is the author of the new book 1919, The Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back.

Dr. Krugler's work is an exciting intervention against a narrative of African-American passivity in the face of white racial pogroms and other violence in the post World War One era. Black America has used a range of means to resist white supremacy. "Non-violence" has come to dominate public memory about the Black Freedom Struggle. Great work such as David's is helping a broader public to learn what black Americans have always known: African-Americans fought back with honor and dignity against the violence that was visited upon them by Jim and Jane Crow, the white mob, and the racial state.

Dr. Krugler and Chauncey discuss the Black Freedom Struggle, why and how the legacy of African-American resistance to white racial violence has been erased in the American public memory, some of the great stories of resistance that David uncovered in his research, and what prompted the nationwide white on black racial terrorism of 1919 and its relationship to Whiteness.

David and Chauncey also talk about the former's great book on American civil defense during the Cold War and how racism even impacted the United States' preparations for defending against a nuclear war.

Friend of WARN Bill the Lizard also stops by to talk about the great new movie Mad Max: Fury Road.

And of course, Chauncey gives an epic recounting of how he damn near broke his leg before going to see Mad Max: Fury Road and what the recovery has been like so far.

May 14, 2015

Robert Neer is the guest on this week's episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show.

He is a historian at Columbia University and the author of Napalm: An American Biography.

Robert's work is a incisive and unique example of the history of objects and how that type of social history can illuminate broader questions of politics, life, and society.

Napalm: An American Biography is more than the history of a horrific weapon: it is an insight into American war fighting, inventions, and foreign affairs.

Dr. Neer and Chauncey talk about the history of napalm, its inventors, the moral questions that (should) govern the use of technology and science, the Vietnam War, American power, and the symbolism and meaning that have been constructed around such an iconic and terrifying weapon in both the world's and America's public imagination.

Chauncey also shares his thoughts on Tom Brady and "Deflategate", the Oklahoma tornadoes and the Amtrak train crash, how Republican racism has hurt America's infrastructure in the Age of Obama, and a frightening encounter with an entitled student who was moved to gross anger by a discussion of wealth inequality and consumerism. 

May 7, 2015

Joe McKinney is the guest on this week's episode of The Chauncey DeVega Show.

He is the author of such popular zombie horror books as Dead CityApocalypse of the DeadFlesh Eaters and The Zombie King.

Mr. McKinney is also a police officer in San Antonio, Texas with expertise in disaster and emergency management.

Joe's professional police expertise and mastery of the zombie horror genre make his work uniquely exciting and compelling.

This makes for a great conversation as Chauncey and Joe discuss all things zombies in this week's episode of the podcast known asThe Chauncey DeVega Show

Joe and Chauncey talk about world building in speculative fiction, the challenges of managing the State's response to natural and other types of disasters, the chaos of a confused and frightened public, how a zombie outbreak would likely be responded to by the police and other authorities, fast versus slow zombies, chasing naked drunk suspects down the street, his approach to the craft of writing, and other related zombie goodness.

Chauncey also shares his thoughts on Freddie Gray and racism beat ambulance chasers, gives some respect to the Washington Post's Radley Balko, getting love from Mark "the Incredible Hulk" Ruffalo and the WWE's Paul Heyman on Twitter, the new Avengers movie, and surrendering to the necessity of wearing under eye concealer makeup. 
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